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UniServices Commercialisation
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Tumour Targeted Irreversible FGFR inhibitors

Categories for this Technology

Oncology

Drug Development

Hypoxia-Activate Pro-Drugs

 

Intellectual Property

FGFR KINASE INHIBITORS AND PHARMACEUTICAL USES

National Phase Application

WO2018160076

 

 

Seeking:

  • Partners/collaborators/investors to develop this technology further.

  • Out-licensing opportunities.

  • Feedback on the opportunity of this technology.

  • Advice on what additional data would you like to see to secure interest?

Summary

A targeted approach to deliver potent irreversible FGFR inhibitors utilising hypoxia selective activation for cancer therapy.

 

Problems Addressed

The human fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) family are a subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases (FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3, FGFR4), transmembrane proteins that facilitate FGF binding and activate multiple cellular signalling cascades. FGFRs regulate important biological processes including cell growth, proliferation, differentiation and survival. Numerous human pathological conditions are associated with FGFR signal deregulation, including a variety of cancer types through FGFR gene amplification or activating mutations.

 

Technology

Extensive knowledge on tumour hypoxia and kinase inhibitor chemistry has resulted in the development of a novel series of potent, irreversible, FGFR1-3 inhibitors currently at lead stage. A bioreductive trigger has been identified that permits targeted release of FGFR inhibitors in the hypoxic tumour environment. The resulting prodrugs allow targeted control of FGFR gain-of-function anomalies, for therapeutic benefit at higher efficacy and with fewer off-target systemic effects.

Applications

Targeting FGFR activity has the potential to treat various cancer types where FGFR1-3 are upregulated, such as:

• Bladder

• Breast

• Endometrial

• Esophageal

• Gastric

• Lung

• Ovarian

• Prostate

Advantages

• Exploits hypoxic tumour environment – targeted release without the requirement to distinguish between native and cancer-driving FGFR

• Improved therapeutic window – prodrug technology results in less risk of off-target and on-mechanism toxicity, allowing more effective treatment scheduling than leading clinical FGFR inhibitors/p>

• Established technology – the bioreductive trigger that controls hypoxia-selective release has previously been evaluated in clinical trial

• Predictive biomarkers – the major contributing enzyme for inhibitor release (STEAP4) has been identified, allowing improved patient selection and response rates

Inventors

Assoc. Professor Adam Patterson

 

Assoc. Professor Jeff Smaill

 

Questions about this Technology?

Contact Dr Sandhya Badrinarayanan